British Rock'n'Roll Heritage Show No. 9

At the Borderline 26th January 2014

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As usual, the driving force behind the headline performers was the Tales From The Woods Band,
featuring musical director and lead guitarist John Spencely (who was credited with
choosing much of the material on the night), brilliant keyboardist Claire Hamlin,
hard-working drummer Brian 'Bunter' Clark, Robb Davis on bass and Alex Bland and Sid
Phillips on tenor and baritone sax respectively.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Claire Hamlin on piano **

Claire Hamlin.

Picture by Nick Cobban.


** Brian Clark on drums **

Brian 'Bunter' Clark.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Alex Bland and Sid Phillips on saxophones **

Alex Bland and Sid Phillips.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Chris Andrews and the TFTW band at the soundcheck **

Chris Andrews and the TFTW band at the soundcheck.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Jimmy Powell at the soundcheck **

Jimmy Powell at the soundcheck.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** MC Rockin' Ricky **

MC Rockin' Ricky who also sang well on Sheila, Del Shannon's The Answer To Everything, Blue Suede Shoes and Summertime Blues.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Sam Hardie **

Sam Hardie.
Sam set the evening off to a great start with some straight ahead rock and roll,
including Flip Flop and Fly, Rockin' Daddy, Move Around, Gene Vincent's Rocky Road
Blues, a couple of Fats Domino numbers (Country Boy and Margie) and some swamp pop in
the form of Joe Barry's Watching Raindrops. Sam's version of Money Honey, performed
in the manner of On Broadway, was a highlight, and his final numbers - Larry Donn's
Honey Bun - and Little Richard's Good Golly Miss Molly - rocked like mad.
A truly great way to kick off the show.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Buddy Britten **

A welcome return to the TFTW stage for Buddy Britten.
His numbers included Rocking My Life Away, I Was There When It Happened, Mailman
Bring me No More Blues, Halfway To Paradise, Mess Of Blues and Adam Faith's Don't
That Beat All, as well as some of his recordings such as Right Now (originally by
Mel Torme), Doug Sahm's She's About A Mover, Money and Long Gone Baby, a Norman
Petty song. He finished off with Tony Joe White's Polk Salad Annie and Chuck's Bye Bye Johnny.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Buddy Britten **

Buddy Britten.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Jimmy Powell 1 **

Jimmy Powell.
Also impressive was Birmingham's Jimmy Powell, an artist who made some excellent bluesy
singles in the sixties with his band The Five Dimensions, including Sugar Babe, which
was produced by Chris Blackwell. He's a large man with a strong voice well suited to the
blues and also plays harmonica at times and air guitar at others. He began with Susie Q
and then did his vocal version of Tom Hark, with words co-written with Jack Good. A swamp
pop song followed (One More Time, I think) and I Can Go Down. Next was a superb blues
number called Ivory, followed by Messing Around With The Blues and Sugar Babe, before
finishing with classy versions of House Of The Rising Sun, What'd I Say and Bony Moronie.
Definitely a class act.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Jimmy Powell 2 **

Jimmy Powell.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Jimmy Powell 3 **

Jimmy Powell.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Mike Berry 1 **

Mike Berry.
The return of Mike Berry was most impressive. He ignored his considerable back catalogue
from the 1960s, running through a first rate rockabilly set instead. Mike has a fantastic
voice, as well as a great self-deprecating sense of humour. He began with Blue Days, Black
Nights and then moved through Mac Curtis's If I Had Me A Woman and Broken Heart, originally
by the Moonlighters. Then it was Elvis's I Don't Care If the Sun Don't Shine, featuring a
blistering guitar solo from John, Warren Smith's Red Cadillac And A Black Moustache, Rock
And Roll On A Saturday Night and I'm Gonna Tell On You (originally by George Fleming).
They were excellent and showed off John's in depth knowledge of the genre as well as Mike's
great flexibility and ability. Other songs included first rate versions of Marvin Rainwater's
Whole Lotta Woman and its B side Baby Don't Go, On My Mind (a Mike Berry original), Rocket
In My Pocket, Johnny Horton's Honky Tonk Hardwood Floor, Don Woody's You're Barking Up The
Wrong Tree (with woofs from the audience), Sanford Clark's The Fool and Teenage Boogie,
originally by Webb Pierce, before finishing with High School Confidential.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Mike Berry 2 **

Mike Berry.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Mike Berry 3 **

Mike Berry.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Chris Andrews 1 **

Chris Andrews.
The top act of the night was Chris Andrews, a man who had hits in his own name in the
sixties and wrote top selling songs for the likes of Sandie Shaw and Adam Faith. He's
written around 800 songs , yet his first eight numbers were rock and roll standards,
presumably to please the predominantly rock and roll loving crowd. These included
Johnny B Goode, Move It (which he performed on Oh Boy in 1959), Be Bop A Lula, Oh Boy,
Rave On, Sixteen Candles, Brand New Cadillac, which he recalled singing at Soho's
famous 2 Is coffee bar, and What'd I Say. Eventually Chris got on to his pop hits of
his era, including Adam Faith's The First Time, Sandie Shaw's Girl Don't Come and
Long Live Love and his own hits To Whom It Concerns and Yesterday Man.


** PChris Andrews 2 **

Chris Andrews.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Chris Andrews 3 **

Chris Andrews.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.


** Chris Andrews 4 **

Chris Andrews.

Picture by Alan Lloyd.

Most of the commentary has been borrowed from The Vinyl Word - many thanks to Nick Cobban!.